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Cub Scouts now serves boys and girls who are in kindergarten through fifth grade. Scouts, families, leaders, and chartered organizations work together to achieve the purposes of Cub Scouting. The ten purposes of Cub Scouting are:

  • Character Development
  • Spiritual Growth
  • Good Citizenship
  • Sportsmanship and Fitness
  • Family Understanding
  • Respectful Relationships
  • Personal Achievement
  • Friendly Service
  • Fun and Adventure
  • Preparation for Scouts BSA

The Cub Scouts of America colors are blue and gold. They have special meaning, which will help our youth see beyond the fun of Cub Scouting to its ultimate goals. The blue stands for truth and spirituality, steadfast loyalty, and the sky above. The gold stands for warm sunlight, good cheer and happiness.

The Benefits of Cub Scouts

Scouting is based on the principles of loving and serving God, of human dignity and the rights of individuals, and of recognizing the obligation of members to develop and use their potential. It is a movement dedicated to bringing out the best in people. Cub Scouting doesn’t emphasize winning as an end result, but rather the far more demanding task of doing one’s best.

When Scouting can help nurture courage and kindness and allow boys and girls to play, to laugh, to develop their imaginations, and to express their feelings, then we will have helped them grow. We want all youth to become useful and stable individuals who are aware of their own potential. Helping them learn the value of their own worth is the greatest gift we can give the youth of today!

Cub Scouting Is Fun

Boys and girls join Cub Scouting because they want to have fun. Fun means a lot more than just having a good time. “Fun” is a code word for the satisfaction one gets from meeting challenges, having friends, feeling good about themselves, and feeling he or she is important to other people. While they are having fun and doing things they like to do, they also learn new things, discover and master new skills, gain self-confidence, and develop strong friendships.

Cub Scouting Has Ideals

Cub Scouting has ideals of spiritual and character growth, citizenship training, and personal fitness. The Scout Oath is a pledge of duty to God and family. The Scout Law is a simple formula for good Cub Scouting and good citizenship. The Cub Scout motto, “Do Your Best,” is a code of excellence. Symbols, such as the Cub Scout sign, Cub Scout salute, and the Living Circle, help our youth feel a part of a distinct group and add to the appeal of belonging to a widely respected organization.

Cub Scouting Strengthens Families

The family is an important influence on our nation’s youth. There are many different types of family structures in today’s world. Scouting is a support to all types of families as well as to organizations to which families belong. We believe in involving families in the training of youth, and we are sensitive to the needs of present-day families. Cub Scouting provides opportunities for family members to work and play together, to have fun together, and to get to know each other a little better.

Cub Scouting Helps Boys and Girls Develop Interests and Skills

In Cub Scouting, boys and girls participate in a broad array of activities. Cub Scouts develop ability and dexterity, and they learn to use tools and to follow directions. Recognition and awards encourage them to learn about a variety of subjects, such as conservation, safety, physical fitness, community awareness, academic subjects, sports, and religious activities. These interests might become a hobby or even a career later in life.

Cub Scouting Provides Adventure

Cub Scouting helps fulfill a boy’s or girl’s desire for adventure and allows them to use their vivid imagination while taking part in skits, games, field trips, service projects, outdoor activities, and more. A variety of adventure themes lets our Scouts play the role of an astronaut, clown, explorer, scientist, or other exciting character. All children find adventure in exploring the outdoors, learning about nature, and gaining a greater appreciation for our beautiful world.

Cub Scouting Has an Advancement Plan

The advancement plan recognizes a Scout’s efforts and achievements. It provides fun, teaches them to do their best, and helps strengthen understanding as family members work with them on advancement requirements. Badges are awarded to recognize advancement, and our Scouts like to receive and wear these badges. The real benefit comes from the worthwhile things the Scouts learn while earning the badges, as their self-confidence and self-esteem grow.

Cub Scouting Creates Fellowship

Our youth like to be accepted as part of a group. In Cub Scouting, boys and girls belong to a small group called Dens where they take part in interesting and meaningful activities with their friends. The Cub Scout den and pack are positive places where Scouts can feel emotionally secure and find support. Each Scout gains status and recognition and has a sense of belonging to this group.

Cub Scouting Promotes Diversity

In Cub Scouting, boys and girls may learn to interact in a group that may include boys and girls of various ethnicity, income levels, religions, and levels of physical ability. By having fun together and working as a group toward common goals, Scouts learn the importance of not only getting along, but also of working side by side with other Scouts of different races, classes, religions, cultures, etc.

Cub Scouting Teaches Duty to God and Country

The BSA believes that no member can grow into the best kind of citizen without recognizing an obligation to God, and encourages both youth and adult leaders to be faithful in their religious duties. The Scouting movement has long been known for service to others. Scouting believes that patriotism plays a significant role in preparing our nation’s youth to become useful and participating citizens. A Cub Scout learns their duty to God, country, others, and self.

Cub Scouting Provides a Year-Round Program

Cub Scouting has no specific “season”—it’s a year-round program. While summer pack activities are informal and there are many activities that Cub Scouts do outdoors, there’s still plenty of fun to be had in the fall and winter: the pinewood derby, blue and gold banquet, skits, stunts, craft projects, and indoor games help to round out an entire year of fun and activities.

Cub Scouting Is a Positive Place

With all the negative influences in today’s society, Scouting provides your son or daughter with a positive peer group who can encourage them in all the right ways. Carefully selected leaders provide good role models and a group setting where values are taught and help to reinforce positive qualities of character.

Joining Cub Scouting

How old (or young) can a boy or girl be to join Cub Scouting?

Cub Scouting is for boys and girls in kindergarten through fifth grade, or 5 to 10 years of age. Boys or girls who are older than 10, or who have completed the fifth grade, can no longer join Cub Scouting, but they may be eligible to join Scouting BSA or Venturing program.

How can I become an adult volunteer in Cub Scouting?

Express your interest to the pack leaders—the Cubmaster or other members of the unit committee. They can help you understand the process and guide you on areas where the pack needs support. All packs welcome parent help.

Must I be a U.S. citizen to join Cub Scouting?

Citizenship is not required of youth or adults to become members of the Scouts BSA.

If you live outside the United States and are not a U.S. citizen, it may be more beneficial to join the Scouting association in your own nation. The World Organization of the Scout Movement provides contact information for all national Scouting organizations on its Web site at www.scout.org.

The Cub Scout Program

Are Cub Scouts the same as Scouts BSA?

Cub Scouting is a program of Scouts BSA—so in that sense, Cub Scouts and Scouts BSA are both members of the same organization. However, they are entirely different programs: Cub Scouting is a family-oriented program designed specifically to address the needs of younger boys and girls.

How often do Cub Scouts meet?

Cub Scouts meet in their dens once each week, and a pack meeting is held for all Cub Scouts and their families once a month. Beyond that, it depends on the den and pack: a den may hold a special activity, such as a service project or visit to a local museum in place of one of the weekly meetings or in addition to the weekly meetings. Likewise, a pack may conduct a special event such as a camp-out as an additional event, or as a substitute for its monthly pack meeting.

May parents attend den meetings?

Cub Scouting is open to parents at all times. Den meetings are intended to be an activity for the individual boys and girls, and your den leader will be working hard to keep the Cub Scouts focused. If you would like to be present at a den meeting, ask the den leader in advance so that the leader can plan a way for you to observe or participate.

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